Copenhagen: a Failure of American Statecraft

After a few weeks hiatus, I am now able to devote some time to blogging. The world has not held still in my absence; over the course of the last month the Lisbon Treaty was ratified, Washington decided to send 30,000 men to Afghanistan, Andhra Pradesh fragmented into two parts, MEND rebels drove Shell out […]

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An Update on the Poland Missile Shield Kerfuffle

Earlier this month I wrote an in depth summary and analysis of the U.S.-Eastern European missile shield kerfuffle. Recent events require me to write a short update to that post. These recent events are adequately summarized in an excerpt from last week’s news: Poland to Accept New US Missile Defense ShieldAFP. 17 October 2009. WARSAW […]

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History Matters: Obama’s Diplomatic Ineptitude

Today the White House briefing room released a press report on American missile architecture in Europe. The portion of the report pertaining to this post reads as follows: Fact Sheet on U.S. Missile Defense Policy:  A “Phased, Adaptive Approach” for Missile Defense in Europe White House Office of the Press Secretary. 17 September 2009. Throughout […]

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Meet Our New Ambassadors (and Foreign Policy Priorities)

I apologize to my readers for the recent dearth in posts. My schedule has now cleared up, and over the next few days I shall post a few of the things that have been sitting inside my blogspot workspace for the last while. The appointment of American ambassadors are tricky things. In many ways, the […]

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The Modern DoD: Guns, Money, and… Public Diplomacy?

As of Monday, the U.S. Army’s Stability Operations Field Manual is in circulation. The field manual will be used as the go-to guide for officers conducting “Stability Operations.” The Washington Post reporting: The Army on Monday will unveil an unprecedented doctrine that declares nation-building missions will probably become more important than conventional warfare and defines […]

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The Future East Asian Security (i.e. The Future of U.S.-Japanese Relations)

For the last 600 years the history of world has been defined by the Atlantic. On these waves sailed the explorer’s caravel, the conquistador’s galleon, the slaver’s schooner, and the trade-man’s gunboat. The winds of the Atlantic have carried the blood of revolutionaries, the cries of pilgrims, and the powder of world wars. It was […]

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