Editorial vs. Coffee House Blogging

“Photo of the Hawelka Cafe on a Quiet Thursday Morning,”  Photograph taken by “KF” (Vienna, 2 Feb 2006). Image Source: Wikimeda There have been many responses to last week’s post, “Requiem For The Strategy Sphere.”  Ryan Evans, Brett Friedman, Adam Elkus, Kelsey Atherton, Andrew Exum, and Mark Safranski all participated in long tweet streams discussing the piece. […]

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Requiem for the Strategy Sphere

I typed “online communities” into Google images and this was the best thing it gave me.  Image Source.  I began blogging in December, 2007. I chose to name this blog The Scholar’s Stage mostly because I thought the alliteration was neat. The title was not without irony. When I began blogging I completely lacked the […]

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Why do Humans Cooperate?

Many of the Stage’s readers will be familiar with the work of “Pseudoerasmus,” currently the internet’s best blogger working on both economic development and macro-history. His most recent post is titled “Where do Pro-Social Institutions Comes From?“  I strongly urge you read it. In essence, Pseudoerasmus’s post tries to answer two questions:  Why do humans cooperate? […]

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Awareness vs. Action: Two Modes of Protest in American History

A “Family Temperance Pledge” from 1887. Group pledges such as these were central to the success of the temperance movement. Source: Library of Congress. “An American Time Capsule: Three Centuries of Broadsides and Other Printed Ephemera.” 2004. In the comment thread of the post “Honor, Dignity, and Victimhood: Three Centuries of American Political Culture” a […]

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Honor, Dignity, and Victimhood: A Tour Through Three Centuries of American Political Culture

Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.(1929 – 1968) stands in front of a bus at the end of the Montgomery bus boycott.   Montgomery, Alabama December 26, 1956 Image Source Jonathan Haidt, the social psychologist who penned The Righteous Mind, wrote an important blog post a few days ago responding to a paper by sociologists Bradley Campbell […]

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America 3.0

It is unusual for me to read a book aimed at popular conservative audiences.  I am something of a disaffected conservative. Crony capitalism and government overreach have proved to be bipartisan endeavors, and I have long lost faith that the Republican party can ever be more than an organ of America’s governing elite. [1] Outside […]

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America Torn Apart: Panel Discussion With Charles Murray and Robert Putnam

This video is worth your time. It is long. But it is worth your time.     Murray & Putnam:  Is Class Division Tearing U.S. Apart? from The Aspen Institute 2012e– and The Atlantic on FORA.tv A longer post on similar themes is in the works. Until that post is completed this is an excellent place to […]

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Far Right and Far Left – Two Peas in a Pod?

Infographic from Ty Morteson. Image Source.One might add “Governments consistently bails out corporate interests with tax-payer money” to the center of the diagram. Several months ago I published a post that describes how the extreme partisanship emanating from Washington is a really just a surface veneer that covers a plutocratic consensus lying beneath. [1] Ashwin Parameswaran, blogging […]

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